• A respected monk and spiritual father from Mount Athos describes the basics of Orthodox spirituality for the beginner or seeker. Written by a monastic for lay people, this helpful book also includes a suggested list of further reading.
  • At a time when so many disaffected Christians are trying to recreate the Church from scratch, Fr. James offers a clear and accessible apology for simply returning to what Christs Church was always meant to be. About the Author: The Rev. Fr. James Guirguis is pastor of St. George Orthodox Church in New Hartford, New York. He has given lectures on topics such as early Christian history as well as sickness, suffering, and healing in the Christian tradition. He regularly adds material to the Out of Egypt weblog. He earned a master's degree from St. Vladimir Orthodox Theological Seminary in 2006. He lives in Utica with his wife Jennifer and their three daughters.
     
  • This memoir of personal transformation has changed countless lives in Romania since it was first published there in 2014. Author Mioara Grigore describes how, as a self-absorbed religion teacher with thoughts of becoming a nun, she began an unlikely courtship with an atheistic math teacher. The math teacher found faith, the two were happily married, and within six and a half years five children were born to them, one with Down syndrome. Mioara's life was full, her home brimming with love. Then came the devastating cancer diagnosis. With unflinching honesty, a keen eye for detail, and endearing humor, Mioara recounts her intense struggle with cancer. With the help of her husband and children, of her spiritual father, and then of new friends who sacrificed themselves for her and her family, she turned that struggle into a journey of spiritual self-discovery. In the agony of her cross-bearing, she found what it means, at the deepest level, to love and be loved by others and by God. Ultimately, hers is a story not only of growth, but of indomitable joy and triumph.
  • "Why can't I receive communion in the Orthodox Church?" This much-needed booklet is written to help explore this sensitive issue from the perspective of the historic Orthodox Faith and her understanding of doctrine, morality, worship, and obedience.
  • From the website of St. Vladimir's Seminary Press: “May you, reader, be blessed and enlightened and encouraged in your struggle by the wisdom contained in this book, to the glory of the All-Holy Trinity and the salvation of your soul.” —Bishop Basil of Wichita and Mid-America (Antiochian Archdiocese) “This book will be marked up and well-worn by those who own it and no doubt shared with other Christians who long for a well of renewal and blessed retreat.” —Very Rev. Dr Chad Hatfield, President of St Vladimir’s Seminary Defeating Sin will help readers better understand the disease that troubles the human soul. Fr Joseph David Huneycutt provides invaluable aids in the spiritual life. He arms readers for spiritual warfare by giving them the tools to help them repent, to turn away from the passions and toward the virtues, and to make a thorough confession. Providing both the “diagnosis” and a course of spiritual therapy, Defeating Sin investigates the nature of the passions and the saving grace of the virtues. Many fundamental questions are explored: –What led to the fall of the devil and his angels? –What led to the fall of Adam and Eve, our first parents? –What causes our own falls? –How can we identify the deceptions and temptations of the enemy? –How do we get up when we fall? –How can we struggle toward God-pleasing solutions to our problems?
  • Why do so many of us good Christians find our spiritual progress blocked? What can we do about the unconscious neurotic tendencies that warp our relations with others? How can we let go of the idealized image we have of ourselves? Drawing on the classic work Our Inner Conflicts by psychiatrist Karen Horney, Archimandrite Symeon shows how we are led to unhealthy attachments, slavish dependency, or a position of compliance—which can even affect our relationship with God. He then explains how today’s Christians can use biblical teachings and the wisdom of the Eastern Orthodox Church Fathers to combat these characteristically modern problems. Archimandrite Symeon Kragiopoulos is a lecturer, preacher, and confessor in the Metropolis of Thessaloniki, Greece. His spiritual lectures often draw on his study of psychology. Thirty books have been published in Greece based on his lectures. He has founded two monastic communities, one dedicated to the Holy Trinity for men and another in honor of the feast of the Nativity of the Theotokos for women.
  • Popular author and speaker Archpriest Michael J. Oleksa has spent most of his life serving the Church in Alaska and advocating for the Native populations there. But he has also had many adventures in other parts of the world. The unifying thread in all his experiences is the providence of God, leading him, providing for him, and guiding him through miracles large and small. In this collection of reminiscences, Fr. Michael relates story after story of the wondrous love and mercy of God working in his life and the lives his ministry has touched. His faith and enthusiasm are contagious.
     
  • This collection of the spiritual writings of St Gregory of Nyssa, selected and introduced by Jean Danielou, has long been recognized as an authoritative introduction to the "father of mysticism," who exploded classical antiquity's static understanding of perfection by showing the Christian life as one of never-ending growth, a true dynamic movement "from glory to glory."
    Modern thought has come more and more to appreciate the depth and insight of Gregory of Nyssa: he epitomizes, in a sense, all that is best in post-Nicean patristic thought... In Gregory's teaching of the sacred history - of the story of God's dealings with men - history and symbol fuse in a way that reveals all the uniqueness of the Christian message.

    Jean Danielou, from the Preface

  • Crisp, practical, and searching, this excellent book combines a solid theological perspective fully informed by the depths of the Christian spiritual tradition with a vigorous and contemporary insight into a culture that has largely forgotten what sin means. Treading the right line between guilt-inducing rhetoric and bland modern self-absolution, it offers an understanding of human sinfulness that is both demanding and hopeful, and helps us rediscover the tools of proper self-knowledge before God. — ROWAN WILLIAMS, former Archbishop of Canterbury Written accessibly and sincerely, Peter Bouteneff’s little book offers the (post-)modern-day reader many helpful insights on—and practical nudges towards—embracing the Church’s oft-misunderstood language of “sin” and “repentance.” — SR VASSA LARIN, host of “Coffee with Sister Vassa” Sin is not guilt nor a mental condition. It is a deep wound in our very being. Peter Bouteneff offers some very straightforward and extremely helpful explanations that will take the reader into a place of self-awareness and honesty—making possible the beginning of repentance. — FR STEPHEN FREEMAN, author of Everywhere Present: Christianity in a One-Storey Universe We call ourselves “sinners” in much of our church life. Yet the sinner identity—when done right—brings peace of mind, a clear conscience, and love for others. Addressing topics like guilt, shame, and self-care, this compassionate guide will help you reflect on your life in surrender to God’s mercy. Written by an internationally recognized professor of Orthodox theology, this book will speak to you wherever you find yourself.
  • “The lesson of love can never be taught simply by words . . . Rather, it is taught by truly giving yourself and communicating the love and longing for Christ to those you serve. . . . How awesome and dignified is Christian service! And how good is the trustworthy and loyal servant who can say along with Christ, ‘Learn from Me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart’ (Matt. 11:29).” This book is essential and inspiring reading for all who would devote their lives to the service of Christ and His Church.
  • From the website of Sebastian Press: It is not easy to teach the Gospel. One of the few among our contemporaries who completely succeeded at overcoming those obstacles is His Holiness Serbian Patriarch Paul (+2009). We are happy for the opportunity that enabled us to have published some of Patriarch Pavle's sermons over an extended period of time first in Kosovo and Metohija (1983-1990), and later in Belgrade. These sermons are dedicated equally to the faithful and to the unfaithful, to Serbs and non-Serbs During the most recent war Patriarch Paul did not forget even the enemies of Serbian people but was worried about their salvation; he prayed to the Lord to show them the way of truth, justice and peace. His role and voice are truly universal. The entire material is arranged chronologically; each sermon being dated and designated by the place and the occasion for it.
  • From the website of SVS Press: Christos Yannaras remains one of the most fascinating voices in the Orthodox world. His theology is drawn less from books, than from encounters, experiences, the fate of Greece and of the world. All this is explored in an immensely engaging conversation with his principal translator, Norman Russell. An indispensible introduc-tion to the range and depth of Yannaras’ thought. —Andrew Louth, Professor Emeritus of Patristic & Byzantine Studies, Durham A captivating portrait of one of the most important contemporary Orthodox theologians and philosophers. It offers insight into Yannaras’ thought, and, perhaps more importantly, his ways of thinking—engaged, open, critical. It offers further depths for those already familiar with his works and a great introduction for those yet to encounter them. —Fr Georges Florovsky Distinguished Professor of Patristics, SVS Christos Yannaras is a philosopher, theologian, and political thinker widely regarded as one of the most important Orthodox thinkers of the twentieth century. He sees theology—along with philosophy—not as an academic enterprise, but as a serious approach to reality in all the dimensions vital to life today. A controversial figure, he castigates much of what passes for Christianity in the East as well as in the West, calling it a religionization of faith. In this book he responds to searching questions concerning his work, setting his thinking as a whole in an integrated vision of knowledge, truth, relationship, and salvation.
  • Of What Life Do We Speak?
    I am the living bread which came down from heaven; if any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever: and the bread that I will give is my flesh, which I will give for the life of the world. - John 6:15
  • The Deceitful Onion Bulb. A Blessing to Smuggle. The Conjuror of Rain. In this collection of stories as whimsical as their titles, award-winning author Olesia Nikolaeva poignantly recounts life for Christian believers in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia. In a manner reminiscent of the bestselling "Everyday Saints" these tales reveal a common theme - the subtle, sometimes imperceptible movement of Divine Providence at work in the lives of saints and sinners alike. Her writings bring us to what the ancient Celts called “thin places” where the boundaries of heaven and earth meet and the sacred and the secular can no longer be distinguished.
  • From the website of SVS Press: Saints who experience the power of prayer say it gives them wings to fly: wings of elation from being in proximity with Jesus Christ and relief from the burden of a sinful conscience. Once engulfed in the grace of the Holy Spirit, the person in prayer experiences death to sin, resurrection in the Spirit, and mystical ascension to the Father. The visible touches the Invisible, and joy wells up in the human heart. This volume evolved experientially: the fruit of fifty-five years of solitude by a contemporary desert monk besieged by prayer. Father Matta's prayer life initially was formed under the direction of the sayings of the Russian Fathers, and later expanded under the direction of other Fathers, both Eastern and Western. He spent whole nights in prayer, reciting one or two passages from these luminaries and begging these saints to enlighten his understanding. Father Matta discloses:
    Whenever physical hunger turned cruel against me, I found my gratification in prayer. Whenever the biting cold of winter was unkind to me, I found my warmth in prayer. Whenever people were harsh to me (and their harshness was severe indeed) I found my comfort in prayer. In short, prayer became my food and my drink, my outfit and my armor, whether by night or by day.
    Desiring to share the lessons he learned, and compelled by the Holy Spirit to do so, he wrote this volume so that he might impart to his readers "a whole course" on the life of prayer.
  • This booklet presents a brief introduction to Orthodoxy, including its history, tradition, spirituality, worship, icons, and approach to evangelism and charitable works. Intended for inquirers of all backgrounds.

  • Discusses many aspects of prayer: personal and corporate, liturgical and spontaneous; and the practice of the Jesus Prayer. Very warm and personal, from an interview with this noted author.
  • Metropolitan Jonah graduated from St Vladimir's Seminary, spent several years in Russia and at Valaam monastery, then returned to the United States. After his tonsure as a monk and ordination to the priesthood, he cared for several small parishes, and was given a blessing to found a monastery in California. The monastery grew, and needed to find a new site to continue to grow. After the move, as before, the monastery saw a constant stream of pilgrims seeking spiritual guidance. It was also becoming known for its publications. Much seemed to depend on Abbot Jonah's vision. In the midst of all this, the Diocese of the South needed an auxiliary bishop, and the choice fell on Abbot Jonah, who became Bishop of Fort Worth. Just days afterward, the 15th All American Council met in Pittsburgh, at a critical time for the OCA, and amid much turmoil. The Metropolitan See was vacant, and a new Metropolitan had to be elected. One evening, Bishop Jonah addressed a restive audience about the situation in the church, and as he spoke, the mood changed. And the next morning, the newly ordained Bishop Jonah was elected Primate of the Orthodox Church in America. "A miracle had somehow quietly taken place. The last had indeed become the first. The abbot of that struggling monastery was elected by the hierarchs, clergy and faithful who had gathered in Pittsburgh to be the Archbishop of Washington and New York, Metropolitan of All America and Canada. His Beatitude's words inspired the Council on that October night and this book presents a few of his thoughts and writings. May they be a blessing to the reader." -Bishop Benjamin, from the Foreword
  • Remember Thy First Love is a graphic description of the three stages in the Christian life according to Elder Sophrony of Essex (1896-1993), disciple of St. Silouan the Athonite (1866-1938) and founder of the Patriarchal and Stavropegic Monastery of St. John the Baptist in Essex, England. In Remember Thy First Love, which complements The Enlargement of the Heart (2006) and The Hidden Man of the Heart (2008), Elder Zacharias details the nature and purpose of the first grace given at the beginning of the Christian spiritual odyssey, the experience of the apparent withdrawal of grace, and then our final adoption as children, by which we become heirs of God and joint-heirs of Christ (cf. Rom. 8:17). Archimandrite Zacharias is a disciple of Elder Sophrony and a member of the Monastery of St. John the Baptist, England.  
  • From the website of Paraclete Press: Poet and literature professor Scott Cairns ran headlong into his midlife crisis – a fairly common experience among men nearing the age of fifty – while walking on the beach with his Labrador. His was not a desperate attempt to recapture youth, filled with sports cars and younger women. Instead, Cairns realized his spiritual life was advancing at a snail's pace and time was running out. Midlife crisis for this this Baptist turned Eastern Orthodox manifested as a desperate need to seek out prayer. Originally published in 2007, this new edition of Short Trip to the Edge include photos, maps and an expanded narrative of Scott's spiritual journey to the mystical peninsula of Mt. Athos. With twenty monasteries and thirteen sketes scattered across its sloping terrain, the Holy Mountain was the perfect place for Scott to seek out a prayer father and discover the stillness of the true prayer life. Told with wit and exquisite prose, his narrative takes the reader from a beach in Virginia to the most holy Orthodox monasteries in the world to a monastery in Arizona and back again as Scott struggles to find his prayer path. Along the way, Cairns forged relationships with monks, priests, and fellow pilgrims.
  • From the website of Ancient Faith Press: by Fr. Meletios Webber An Orthodox priest with a doctorate in counseling, Fr. Webber helps us to understand addiction and explores ways to overcome it. He clearly and skillfully explains the Twelve Steps of the Fellowship of Alcoholics Anonymous. In correlating the Twelve Steps with basic Orthodox theology, Fr. Mel identifies the implication of the Twelve Steps for Orthodox, and for all Christians. Using examples from the life of the Orthodox Church, he shows how the Steps can be a valuable resource for our own spiritual journey. Reviews Written by Father Meletios Webber...Steps Of Transformation: An Orthodox Priest Explores The Twelve Steps correlates the twelve steps used by Alcoholics Anonymous with basic Orthodox Christian theology. Offering understanding, wisdom, and insight to all who turn to God when weighed down by implacable addiction, Steps Of Transformation is a sober, spiritual, and open-hearted work of benevolence which is especially recommended reading for Christians involved in 12-Step programs for substance abuse, compulsive gambling, anger management, or any other behavioral or psychological disabilities.
     
  • From the back cover: "Only when our life is wholly directed towards God do we become capable of seeing God in all and begin to do so by faith—not only in all the significant happenings of life but even in the insignificant ones—and to submit entirely to His holy will." The 19th century saw a renaissance of Russian spirituality in the writings of St Ignatius (Brianchaninov) and St Theophan the Recluse, many of whose works have become well-known throughout the world. This book brings to an English-speaking audience the spiritual counsels of another Russian monastic of the same period. Born into a patrician family in the Don region, Anna Mikhailovna Sebriakova forsake the world at the age of seventeen and joined the Ust'-Medveditskii convent, where she was tonsured a nun with the name Arsenia. She subsequently served as abbess of this same monastery for 41 years. Heavily influenced by the writings of St ignatius, she took up correspondence with his brother P.A. Brianchaninov and became his spiritual mentor. Her letters to Peter Alexandrovich form the bulk of this book. Also offered are a selection of her personal notes and letters to other individuals. Abbess Arsenia’s counsels are steeped in Holy Scripture and in the inspiration that she draws from the services of the Orthodox Church. Throughout, she emphasizes the need to humble oneself, discern the will of God, and fulfill it through every moment of our life.
  • This book is the first comprehensive presentation of the teachings of over 120 Orthodox Saints and dozens of holy hierarchs, clergy, and theologians on the subject of the soul’s exodus to the next life. With over 750 pages of source material featuring many rare images and dozens of texts translated into English for the first time, The Departure of the Soul is unique as both the sole reference edition on the subject and a fascinating and spiritually profitable book for anyone seeking insight into one of the greatest mysteries of all. The book also reveals over 100 falsifications, misrepresentations, and errors contained in the publications of authors who oppose the teaching of the Church, thus definitively ending the 40-year controversy in the Church. The book features:
    • Full endorsements by eight Orthodox hierarchs
    • Foreword by His Eminence Metropolitan Nikolaos of Mesogaia and Lavreotiki (Church of Greece)
    • Spans the 2,000-year history of the Orthodox Church with chapters on:
      • Holy Scripture
      • The Liturgical Services
      • The Writings of the Fathers of the Church
      • The Lives of the Saints
      • Iconography
      • Commemoration and Prayer for the Departed
      • Contemporary Opponents of the Church’s Teaching
    • Many rare images and dozens of texts translated for the first time from the original Greek, Russian, Slavonic, Serbian, and Romanian
    • Complete scholarly apparatus
  • Raven Son: Book Three

    A land destroyed by war. An army of giants on the rampage. Can a crippled girl heal the world before it dies? All 16-year-old Khaidu ever wanted was her own hunting eagle. Her ten brothers laugh at her. The rule-bound world of the Gumiren nomads has no place for a girl hunter, much less a crippled one. But Khaidu has a secret. She masters the ancient magic of eagle-binding and captures the largest eagle her tribe has ever seen. Except her eagle isn’t an eagle at all. She’s a dying queen under an enchantment. Khaidu’s binding unlocks an ancient curse of blood and loss. As the curse turns Khaidu’s people against each other, the bond between eagle and hunter shatters. To find her lost eagle, Khaidu will brave monstrous beasts, face an army of shape-shifting giants, and cross the known world…only to be faced with a terrible truth. If Khaidu cannot save the queen in time, the world itself may die with her. The Heart of the World is the third book in an epic fantasy series. Inspired by the Russian fairy tale “Finist the Bright Falcon,” it features complex characters, gorgeous magical landscapes, and unexpected plot twists. If you like creative twists on myths and legends and classic fantasy, then you’ll love Nicholas Kotar’s sweeping tale.
  • From the website of SVS Press: A number of years have passed since Fr Alexander Schmemann's untimely death on December 13, 1983 at the age of sixty-three. Fr Schmemann was known for his many-faceted and eloquent gifts as preacher, professor and priest. His insight into contemporary culture, church life and liturgical celebration left an indelible mark on generations of Christians. These journals offer insight into the quiet, intimate side of his life. They witness the magnitude of his heart, his absolute humanity. Translated and edited by his wife, the abridged journals reveal his recollections and experiences and record his formative creative thought on all manner of subjects. Fr Schmemann writes, "The meaning of this journal is not so much a desire to record events, but a kind of visit into myself." They record, often with brutal honesty, his impatience and frustration with himself and events, but above all, his liberation and freedom "in Christ and His Church." We see a life replete with the effort to call people to live "higher and more openly," to become restored human beings. His love of God, deep faith and reverent love of family serve as an endless wellspring shaping his person. Reading these journals we are inspired, enlivened and renewed.  
  • In these previously unpublished talks, Fr Alexander Schmemann critiques contemporary culture’s distorted understanding of death. He then examines the Church’s rites for burial and her prayers for the dead. Though they are often misunderstood, at the heart of the services Fr Alexander finds the paschal proclamation: “Christ is risen from the dead, trampling down death by death, and upon those in the tombs bestowing life.” “For the Orthodox Church, the time has arrived not to reform the liturgy of death, nor to modernize it (God forbid!), but simply to rediscover it. To rediscover it in its truth and glory means in its connection with the faith of the Church, with the meaning—for the dead, for us, for the whole world and the entire creation—of Christ’s deathless death, and in connection with baptism and Eucharist, with Lent and Pascha, with the whole life of the Church and each one of us, her members. This rediscovery is needed first of all by the Church, but also by our secular culture, for which, whether we know it or not, we are responsible. How are we to rediscover it?” – Alexander Schmemann,  The Liturgy of Death
  • By Archbishop Alexander (Golitzin)
    From as early as the ninth century, Mount Athos -- a monastic re-public situated on a peninsula in northern Greece extending some 35 miles into the Aegean Sea -- has been a monastic center and a spiritual beacon of the Orthodox world. As the present collection of essays, sermons, narratives, and apophthegmata shows, the significance of the work of the monks who come to Athos to devote themselves to God continues undiminished, as does the vitality of their contribution to the spiritual life of Orthodoxy worldwide. In these pages we see the simplicity and truth of the Gospel reflected in anecdotes of contemporary Fathers of the Holy Mountain; we read of the connection between the light of Christ’s Transfiguration on Mount Tabor and Orthodox monastic spirituality; we learn how St. Herman of Alaska, America’s first Orthodox saint, was a kind of gift to America from Athos. Several writings by Archimandrite Aemilianos (Vapheides), Abbot of Simonos Petras Monastery on Mount Athos, set forth the critical importance of the spiritual father and the Jesus prayer in an Orthodox monastery, and the link between monasticism and martyrdom. A leading French Catholic scholar recounts in detail his path to Orthodoxy over a span of many years. Also included is the Tomos of Mount Athos in Defense of the Holy Hesychasts -- an important Orthodox doctrinal document, written in the fourteenth century by St. Gregory Palamas and signed by the elders of the Holy Mountain. These writings, together with the others in this volume, have all been written by Athonite monks. All but one of them appears in English for the first time, translated by His Eminence, Archbishop Alexander (Golitzin), who contributes, in his illuminating Introduction, an examination of Athonite history, organization, and daily life.
    Originally Printed in 1994 by St. Tikhon's Seminary Press
  • This powerful message calls for a "new form of monasticism without celibacy and without the desert." Provides a vision for the future of Orthodoxy in North America, and a crystal-clear agenda for reaching its goals.
  • The Mystery of Holy Baptism: Patristic Interpretation and the Present Reality - Spiritual Life Series vol. 6 by Hieromonk Gregorios, Elder of the Cell of St. John the Theologian, Koutloumousiou Monastery, Mount Athos. Trans. by Fr. Michael Monos, Trim size 4x6, 68pp.
  • From Chapter One: We often say that we love God, and sing the praises of His love, but we are not able to pray without distractions. If this is the case, it means we are not speaking truthfully, that our praises are empty, because genuine love for God is the generative cause of undistracted prayer, and undistracted prayer is the generative cause of the love of God. Would you like to have a practical standard of measurement to see if you love God? Pay attention and observe whether or not you pray without distractions. See, in other words, if when you pray your mind is distracted and cut into pieces by desires, thoughts, passions, or by any other foreign element that is not spiritual or immaterial. If there is something that is able to divide our mind and cut it into pieces, this means that we do not love God, for the love of God is like a strong, surrounding wall that protects us and prevents anything from outside entering our inner, spiritual world. Otherwise it’s like I have a saw and I use it to cut up a piece of wood, and in so doing the pieces fly in different directions—something similar happens to the mind when it is torn to pieces by thoughts and passions, by the various inclinations of the heart, by desires, and anything else like this. —Elder Aimilianos
  • Sale!

    The Sunflower

    $23.95 $20.35
    "May our love for the Sun, the will of God, be as strong as the sunflower’s, so that even in days of hardship and sorrow we will continue to sail unerringly along the sea of life, following the directions of the barometer and compass of God’s will that leads us to the safe haven of eternity." This is a thoroughly practical manual of the spiritual life focusing on the central goal of every Christian: learning the will of God and struggling to mold our life to it, just as Christ “humbled Himself and became obedient.” (Phil. 2:8) Even more fundamentally, St John addresses the question of why we should care about God’s will. Finally, the reader will find eternal wisdom running through these writings on questions of theodicy, free will, and Divine Providence. This work is reminiscent of the classic text "Unseen Warfare" in its historical genesis as an Orthodox redaction of an originally Roman Catholic text. First published in 1627 as “The Heliotropium” it was the work of a German Jesuit writer Jeremias Drexelius. The future St John adapted this text for an Orthodox audience as a student and then teacher at the Kiev Academy in the 1670’s but it was not published until 1714, just a year before the author’s death. This is the first English edition of St John’s text, further edited and abbreviated for the contemporary reader.
  • From the author of The Scent of Holiness, The Sweetness of Grace is a collection of stories derived from conversations with Orthodox nuns, monks, and laypeople, along with experiences of Orthodox life in South Korea, Greece, and North America. Those who enjoyed Everyday Saints will enjoy these similar stories from other parts of the Orthodox world.

  • From the back cover:
    Idleness. Apathy. Restlessness. Procrastination. These are symptoms of what early Christian theologians called despondency (acedia), a spiritual sickness rooted in a lack of care or effort. A condition as old as the ancients, despondency thrives in today's culture of leisure, anxiety, and digital distraction. Time and Despondency is a penetrating synthesis of ancient theology, spiritual memoir, and self-help practicality. It envisions despondency as the extension of a broken relationship with the experience of time. Driven by the fear of death and the anxiety of living, despondency drives us to abandon the present moment, forsaking the only temporal realm in which we have true fellowship with Christ. The remedies offered by time-honored Christian thinkers for this predicament constitute not only an antidote to despondency but also stepping stones back to the present moment. In regaining the sacredness of time, we re-encounter the Resurrection of Christ in the dark and restless moments of our lives.

    Download the free study guide from Ancient Faith Press here!

     
  • "In the following pages, Fr. Stephen Muse provides us, not with a manual of prayer, but with an opening into the life of prayer by unveiling for us “the mystery of embodied life and the uncreated divine life.” He provides an entryway for us, as human beings with all our brokenness, weakness and fear, to dialogue with the uncreated life and light of God through prayer. Everything in this wonderful book provides the reader with an opportunity to learn what it means to truly breathe prayer and invites us to begin and continue the journey of seeking to draw closer to our Lord Jesus Christ with every breath." 

           His Beatitude Metropolitan Tikhon,  Archbishop of Washington, Metropolitan of All America and Canada

  • Without apology, Orthodoxy proclaims itself to be the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church founded by Jesus Christ on the day of Pentecost. So how do Orthodox Christians look upon those outside the visible expression of the faith? Are all Christians united invisibly and mystically in heaven, thus making the question of church membership irrelevant and superfluous?
     
  • What do Orthodox Christians believe about the Second Coming of Christ? About divorce? About abortion? About spiritual gifts? Compiled as a practical A to Z handbook of basic Orthodox teaching on a variety of subjects.