• This icon of St. Innocent is from the iconostasis of the Optina Elders Chapel in Holy Trinity Monastery.   St. Innocent (a.d. 1797-1879) was a gifted student at his church boarding school.  He married at the age of 20 and had six children.  After serving as a deacon in Siberian Irkutsk, he was sent as a missionary to Alaska in 1824, where he worked among the native tribes, especially the Aleut Indians.  Learning the Aleut tongue, he translated many Orthodox liturgical and spiritual books into their language.  When his wife died, St. Innocent took up the monastic life, and returned to America after being consecrated its first bishop.

    St. Innocent tirelessly labored among his flock, preaching the Gospel everywhere.  He encouraged services in the common language and Native Americans to enter the priesthood.  When he was called back to Russia to become the Metropolitan of Moscow, he still worked for the American mission, asking all clergy to be fluent in English, and encouraged everyone to make the Orthodox Faith their own.  He is called the Enlightener of the Aleut and Apostle to the Americas.  O Holy St. Innocent, pray to God for us!

  • This icon of St. Innocent is from the iconostasis of the Optina Elders Chapel in Holy Trinity Monastery.   St. Innocent (a.d. 1797-1879) was a gifted student at his church boarding school.  He married at the age of 20 and had six children.  After serving as a deacon in Siberian Irkutsk, he was sent as a missionary to Alaska in 1824, where he worked among the native tribes, especially the Aleut Indians.  Learning the Aleut tongue, he translated many Orthodox liturgical and spiritual books into their language.  When his wife died, St. Innocent took up the monastic life, and returned to America after being consecrated its first bishop.

    St. Innocent tirelessly labored among his flock, preaching the Gospel everywhere.  He encouraged services in the common language and Native Americans to enter the priesthood.  When he was called back to Russia to become the Metropolitan of Moscow, he still worked for the American mission, asking all clergy to be fluent in English, and encouraged everyone to make the Orthodox Faith their own.  He is called the Enlightener of the Aleut and Apostle to the Americas.  O Holy St. Innocent, pray to God for us!

  • In September of 1794, a group of eight monks from Russia’s Valaam Monastery completed a long and hazardous journey to the shores of Alaska.  They began planting the first seeds of the missionary effort that has brought forth the rich fruits of holiness on American soil ever since.  Many souls have been inspired, nurtured, and guided to salvation through the sacrifice and prayers of these holy monks and their spiritual descendants, to whom we are all so greatly indebted.  There has been now over 200 years of Orthodoxy in America for this seed to set in and flourish.

    In this icon is a gathering (synaxis in Greek) of many of the Orthodox saints who have struggled and lived on this soil in America.  It shows St. Herman and St. Juvenaly from the original Valaam mission, St. Innocent of Moscow and Alaska, the first Orthodox bishop to serve in America, and his successor St. Tikhon, who subsequently became Patriarch of Moscow and suffered for the Faith under the Communists.  We also see St. Peter the Aleut, the first Native American martyr, and St. John of Shanghai and San Francisco, who is still incorrupt, and was glorified on July 2, 1994.

    Large measures 9" x 9"

  • St. Tikhon (a.d. 1865-1925) was born in a village near Pskov, Russia. He was very bright and entered the Theological Academy in St. Petersburg when just 19. He was very knowledgeable and was jokingly referred to by his classmates as “the patriarch.” Tonsured a monk at 26, he was then made the Bishop of Liublin, Poland when just 32, but was transferred to America within a year to become the Bishop of the Aleutians and Alaska in 1898. St. Tikhon worked hard for nine years to overcome ethnic and language barriers to make the Faith accessible to all. At that time all of the various ethnic groups, whether Greek, Serbian, Rou-manian, Albanian, Carpatho-Russian, Antiochian, or Russian, were under the omophor of the bishops of the Russian Diocese, who served each according to its needs and in its own language and customs. St. Tikhon also reached out to converts and blessed English translations of the Divine Services and Sacraments. He was called back to Russia in 1907, and elected the Patriarch in 1917 after the fall of the Russian monarchy. Terribly persecuted by the Communists, he remained faithful until he died of exhaustion in a.d. 1925. Sizes are approximate
  • This icon is a print mounted on wood. Sizes are approximate.
  • St. Tikhon (a.d. 1865-1925) was born in a village near Pskov, Russia. He was very bright and entered the Theological Academy in St. Petersburg when just 19. He was very knowledgeable and was jokingly referred to by his classmates as “the patriarch.” Tonsured a monk at 26, he was then made the Bishop of Liublin, Poland when just 32, but was transferred to America within a year to become the Bishop of the Aleutians and Alaska in 1898. St. Tikhon worked hard for nine years to overcome ethnic and language barriers to make the Faith accessible to all. At that time all of the various ethnic groups, whether Greek, Serbian, Rou-manian, Albanian, Carpatho-Russian, Antiochian, or Russian, were under the omophor of the bishops of the Russian Diocese, who served each according to its needs and in its own language and customs. St. Tikhon also reached out to converts and blessed English translations of the Divine Services and Sacraments. He was called back to Russia in 1907, and elected the Patriarch in 1917 after the fall of the Russian monarchy. Terribly persecuted by the Communists, he remained faithful until he died of exhaustion in a.d. 1925.
  • St. Tikhon (a.d. 1865-1925) was born in a village near Pskov, Russia. He was very bright and entered the Theological Academy in St. Petersburg when just 19. He was very knowledgeable and was jokingly referred to by his classmates as “the patriarch.” Tonsured a monk at 26, he was then made the Bishop of Liublin, Poland when just 32, but was transferred to America within a year to become the Bishop of the Aleutians and Alaska in 1898. St. Tikhon worked hard for nine years to overcome ethnic and language barriers to make the Faith accessible to all. At that time all of the various ethnic groups, whether Greek, Serbian, Rou-manian, Albanian, Carpatho-Russian, Antiochian, or Russian, were under the omophor of the bishops of the Russian Diocese, who served each according to its needs and in its own language and customs. St. Tikhon also reached out to converts and blessed English translations of the Divine Services and Sacraments. He was called back to Russia in 1907, and elected the Patriarch in 1917 after the fall of the Russian monarchy. Terribly persecuted by the Communists, he remained faithful until he died of exhaustion in a.d. 1925.